Followership Paper

Followership Paper

Required Reading: Harvard Course pack

1.     Authentic Followership: Being a More Effective Leader, by Rob Goffee, Gareth Jones

2.     Followership: It’s Personal, Too, by Robert Goffee, Gareth Jones

3.     Why Great Followers Make the Best Leaders, by Chris Musselwhite

4.     In Praise of Followers, by Robert E. Kelley

From your reading, discuss the following questions:   What is followership?

Are followership skills required to be a good leader? Why, why not? What are the key skills of good followership? How would you assess your own followership skills? Where are you strong and which areas need development of your followership skills? What was your key learning from this paper?

Avoid using quotes from the articles. Explain the concepts in your own words and use proper citations and references. Use personal voice e.g. I agree, I feel, I believe, etc. and real-life examples from your experience.

Suggested format requirements: Write 3-4 pages. Use Times New Roman, 12 font size, double space.  Use references and in-text citations in APA format.

Grading Rubric:

Format: 10% of your grade. Paper should be well written and organized, uses clear English and logical development of argument. Proper APA style for citations and references was used.

Content:

18 points: Explained followership concepts using insightful examples on how you can use it.  Evaluated your own level and identified areas for development. Showed deep level of critical thinking and used your personal voice.

16 points: Explained followership concepts using examples; however, critical thinking and development of argument need development.

14 points: Paper was written according to the requirements but could be improved by using more examples or outside research. Writing needs development in critical thinking and writing.

12 points: Paper did not follow most of the requirements. Did not demonstrate understanding of the question and key concepts from the suggested material.

Under 12 points

Unsatisfactory effort

Followership: It’s Personal, Too

by Robert Goffee and Gareth Jones

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This document is authorized for use only by Jintao Luo in SFSU-MGT-648-Fall 2020 taught by Craig Nathanson, San Francisco State University from Aug 2020 to Dec 2020.

Required Reading r0111a Barbara Kellerman

HBR Survey r0111b Personal Histories: Leaders Remember the Moments and People That Shaped Them

Primal Leadership: The Hidden Driver r0111c of Great Performance Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee

HBR Roundtable r0111d All in a Day’s Work A roundtable with Raymond Gilmartin, Frances Hesselbein, Frederick Smith, Lionel Tiger, Cynthia Tragge-Lakra, and Abraham Zaleznik

What Titans Can Teach Us r0111e Richard S. Tedlow

Best of HBR

What Leaders Really Do r0111f John P. Kotter

The Hard Work of Being a Soft Manager r0111g William H. Peace

Leadership in a Combat Zone r0111h William G. Pagonis

Leadership: Sad Facts and Silver Linings r0111j Thomas J. Peters

The Work of Leadership r0111k Ronald A. Heifetz and Donald L. Laurie

In Closing r0111l Followership: It’s Personal, Too Robert Goffee and Gareth Jones

December 2001

For the exclusive use of J. Luo, 2020.

This document is authorized for use only by Jintao Luo in SFSU-MGT-648-Fall 2020 taught by Craig Nathanson, San Francisco State University from Aug 2020 to Dec 2020.

Finally, followers will tell you that a leader is nearby when they get a buzzing feeling. People want excitement, chal- lenge, and edge in their lives. It makes them feel engaged in the world. And so, despite all the literature that tells you a leader needn’t be charismatic, follow-

ers will sooner feel leadership from someone who is extro- verted and energetic than from someone who isn’t. Right or wrong, that’s how followers feel.

Some traditional theories of leadership portray the follower as an empty vessel waiting to be led, or even transformed, by the leader. Other theories suggest that followers require nurturing and need to be per- suaded to give of themselves. But these theories would have us believe that followers are

passive. Yes, followership implies com- mitment, but never without conditions. The follower wants the leader to create feelings of significance, community, and excitement – or the deal is off.

After all, to the follower, as much as it is to the person who stands above him in the organizational hierarchy, leader- ship is entirely personal.

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Copyright © 2001 by Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation. All rights reserved. 3

he articles in this special issue bear lucid testimony to the fact that

leadership has endured as the burning issue for all kinds of organizations – and for executives themselves as they grap- ple to define their personal successes (or lack thereof) in business. But to be ade- quately understood, leadership must be seen for what it is: part of a duality or a relationship. There can be no leaders with- out followers.

So let’s end this compendium by looking at this incendiary topic through the follower’s eyes. We’re lucky; the sociologi- cal and psychological literature on the follower’s experience is rich indeed. It tells us that peo- ple seek, admire, and respect – that is, they follow – leaders who produce within them three emotional responses.

The first is a feeling of significance. Followers will give their hearts and souls to authority figures who say, “You really matter,” no matter how small the followers’ contributions may be. This dy- namic, of course, comes from the human drive to be valued. We yearn to not live and die in vain. When leaders, then, her- ald the significance of an individual’s work, they are rewarded with loyalty, even obedience. They have given mean-

ing to a follower’s life, and as a basis for a relationship, that is not just sturdy; it is as solid as cement.

The second emotional response follow- ers want from their leaders is a feeling of community. Now there’s a messy con- cept – community. The library is filled

with books trying to define it. But for our purposes, let’s say community occurs when people feel a unity of purpose around work and, simultaneously, a will- ingness to relate to one another as human beings. It is the rare business ex- ecutive who can create such an environ- ment. But you can be sure that when a feeling of community is successfully engi- neered, it is so deeply gratifying that fol- lowers will call the person who created it their leader.

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by Robert Goffee and Gareth Jones

Robert Goffee is a professor of organizational behavior at London Business School. Gareth Jones is the director of human resources and

internal communications at the BBC and a former professor of organizational development at Henley Management College in Oxfordshire,

England. Goffee and Jones are founding partners of Creative Management Associates, an organizational consulting firm in London.

T

Followership It’s Personal, Too

I n C l o s i n g

For the exclusive use of J. Luo, 2020.

This document is authorized for use only by Jintao Luo in SFSU-MGT-648-Fall 2020 taught by Craig Nathanson, San Francisco State University from Aug 2020 to Dec 2020.

For the exclusive use of J. Luo, 2020.

This document is authorized for use only by Jintao Luo in SFSU-MGT-648-Fall 2020 taught by Craig Nathanson, San Francisco State University from Aug 2020 to Dec 2020.

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